Witness to Change. The Domestic Security Service and the Global 1980s

Danny Pronk

Danny Pronk joined the Netherlands Institute of International Relations ‘Clingendael’ as a Senior Research Fellow in July 2018 and is head of the Strategic Foresight program. His research focuses on geopolitical trend analysis, alternative futures development, and horizon scanning. He has over twenty years of experience as a practitioner in intelligence, a complementary aspect of international relations together with diplomacy. He started his career as an Intelligence Officer in the Royal Netherlands Air Force and has since held several senior analytical and operational leadership positions at both the Netherlands General Intelligence and Security Service (GISS) and the Defense Intelligence and Security Service (DISS). He has also served as an Intelligence Staff Officer in the United Nations Mission in Ethiopia and Eritrea (UNMEE), and as head of the National Intelligence Cell at the headquarters of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan. Danny holds a Master’s degree in Political Science (International Relations) from Leiden University, and a Bachelor’s degree in Military Arts and Sciences from the Royal Military Academy in Breda. He specializes in diplomatic, political and military history, and in strategic studies, with a special interest in the so-called “missing dimension” within the study of international relations: intelligence. He lectured at the Universities of Amsterdam and Leiden, and at the Netherlands Defense Academy on the topics of intelligence analysis and strategic warning.

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Sylwia Szyc
The Response of the State Security apparatus in November 1989 - an attempt of self-preservation

Daniel Běloušek

Mr. Daniel Běloušek graduated with M.A. in Political Science and International Relations, Faculty of Social Sciences, Charles University, Prague. Since February 2008 he had been employed in the Security Services Archive in Prague where he held a position of Head of the Operative Dossiers and Investigation Files Unit. As an Archivist he was responsible for handling and preserving of certain types of archival materials. As an Historian Mr. Běloušek concentrated on the agenda of the Czechoslovak Communist Intelligence Services especially in era of seventies and eighties of the 20th century. He has published articles related to the former Czechoslovak intelligence case officers, such as Jan Fila or Vlastimil Ludvík, who defected to the West and their actions crippled the potential of the Czechoslovak espionage. Among other themes Mr. Běloušek focused on increased rivalry in the 1980s between two military Czechoslovak intelligence services – the internal Military Counter-intelligence on one hand, and the external Intelligence Department of the General Headquarters of the Czechoslovak People's Army on the other.

The Act No. 262/2011 Coll., on the Participants in Anti-Communist Opposition and resistance, defines certain tasks for the Ministry of Defence such as issuing the certificate of a participant in anti-communist opposition in the period from 25 February 1948 to 17 November 1989. In June 2014 Mr. Běloušek started working in this Ministry in the Department of Veterans Affairs and take an active part in the decisions on applications for recognition for having actively resisted the communist regime in Czechoslovakia. He focuses the agenda of so-called „Third resistance“ also in the academic field.

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Sylwia Szyc
Bulgarian Intelligence services and Political Changes in the Eastern Bloc in 1989

Nadia Boyadjieva

Professor Nadia Boyadjieva obtained an M.A. in History from  Sofia University, an M.A. in Law from New Bulgarian University, and a Ph.D. from the Faculty of History at Sofia University in 1999 with a dissertation on U.S. policy toward the conflict in Bosnia and Hercegovina. She has taught in the Faculty of Law at Plovdiv University since 2000 and in 2013 she was promoted to be a Full Professor of International Law and International Relations.

Since 2016 she has also been a Full Professor at the Institute for Balkan Studies of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, in Sofia.  Since September 2015, she has been a long-term Visiting scholar at Harvard University, with an office at Harvard's Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies and Cold War Studies Center.( https://daviscenter.fas.harvard.edu/about-us/people/nadia-boyadjieva)

In 2017 she was awarded a Doctor of Sciences (D.Sc.) degree in International Law and International Relations.Professor Boyadjieva was a NATO/EAPC Fellow, a John F. Kennedy Institute Fellow  at the Free University of Berlin (Germany), a Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian law  fellow (Lund, Sweden), a Senior Fulbright Visiting Scholar at the Cold War Studies Center (Harvard University, USA), a Black Sea Security program fellow (Kennedy School, Harvard University), and an Advanced Study of Nonviolent Conflict fellow (Fletcher School, Tufts University), an Open Society Archive Fellow (Budapest, Hungary). She has worked in many archive in the Russia, United States, Hungary, etc.
Her research and publications have dealt extensively with issues of international relations and diplomacy, USSR and U.S. foreign policy in the Balkans; NATO-Russia relations, and the evolution of various international security systems in the modern era, human rights and minority issues, peacekeeping, and other topics.

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Sylwia Szyc
Between threat and inspiration. Polish intelligence station in Beijing reports on Chinese authorities and pro-democracy demonstrators attitudes towards the “Solidarity” Movement in the late 1980s

Marek Hańderek

Marek Hańderek is a researcher in the Historical Research Office of the Institute of National Remembrance in Warsaw and lecturer in the Institute of the Middle and Far East of the Jagiellonian University in Kraków. He received his PhD in history from Jagiellonian University in April 2018. His first book based on PhD dissertation was published in June 2019. He is currently working on a book concerning Polish and Czechoslovak participation in the Neutral Nations Supervisory Commission in Korea during the Cold War. His research is based on Polish, Czech, American and British archival sources. He has presented his findings on this field during "The Korean History Workshop for Overseas Doctoral Students" held by Korea Foundation in Seoul as well as during the "Need to Know" VII Conference in Budapest. Since 2018 he has collaborated with the Cold War International History Project run by Wilson Center. Recently he published a collection of Polish documents referring to North Korea, accompanied by his introduction entitled “North Korea revelations from the Polish Archives: Nukes, Succession and Security”. His research interests include: Cold War studies, Far East affairs, history of intelligence services and geopolitics.

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Sylwia Szyc
Intelligence Lessons of the Cold War

Michael Herman

Michael Herman served from 1952 to 1987 in the British intelligence community, and since retirement has been associated with academic institutions, mainly Nuffield College Oxford.  He is the Founder Director of the Oxford Intelligence Group, and an honorary D.Litt of Nottingham University.  His publications are listed in an interview published online in 2016 in Intelligence and National Security, available on the journal’s website.

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Sylwia Szyc
Transformation of intelligence services after the end of the Cold War and the Birth of the European School of Intelligence Studies

Władysław Bułhak

(born 1965), Ph.D. in History,

2016-present – senior researcher at the Historical Research Office of the Institute of National Remembrance (IPN) in Warsaw. Co-organizer of the “Need to Know” international conferences since 2011 together with Anna Piekarska (presently deputy director of the Museum of Polish History) and Thomas W. Friis (University of Southern Denmark). A former member of the editorial board of „Pamięć i Sprawiedliwość” (bi-annually of IPN), member of the editorial board “Wywiad i kontrwywiad Polski XX w.” (Polish intelligence and counterintelligence in XXth Century, published annually). He published on Polish-Russian relations, intelligence and counter-intelligence of Polish underground during the German occupation of Poland, and Polish communist intelligence. His in depth monograph (800 pages) on the Polish communist intelligence operations against the Holy See (Vatican) in the period from 1962  to 1978 is  due to appear in autumn 2019.

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Sylwia Szyc
The Soviet Intelligence Services and the Impact of the 1989 Upheavals in East Central Europe

Mark Kramer

Mark Kramer is the Panitza Professor of International Relations and Director of Cold War Studies at Harvard University and is also a Senior Fellow of Harvard’s Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Trained originally in higher mathematics, he later studied international relations as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University and was subsequently an Academy Scholar in Harvard’s Academy of International Studies. He is the author of many books and articles, including, most recently, Reassessing History from Two Continents (2013), Imposing, Maintaining, and Tearing Open the Iron Curtain: The Cold War and East-Central Europe, 1945-1990 (2013), The Kremlin and the 1989 Revolutions (2014), and Moscow and German Reunification, 1990 (2015). He is also the editor of the forthcoming 3-volume set of essays The Fate of Communist Regimes, 1989-1991: The End of an Era.

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Sylwia Szyc
Dealing with the devil. Nordic relations with the BND

Thomas Wegener Friis

Ph.d., Associate Professor at the Center for Cold War Studies of the University of Southern Denmark. He is co-founder and co-organizer of the Need to Know conference series which have convened yearly since 2011. In the last few years, he has been vising scholar at the Center for Military History and Social Sciences of the Bundeswehr, University of Uppsala, the Institute of Nationale Remembrance, and the Bar-Ilan University. He is Regional Editor of for Northern and Central Europe for “Intelligence, Security and Public affairs” and guest editor of “International Journal for Intelligence and National Security”. His main fields of research are intelligence and security of the Cold War in Northern Europe, Foreign relation of Denmark, and Central- and Eastern European history.

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Sylwia Szyc
Spies and Diplomats: Polish- Dutch Intelligence Rivalry

Przemysław Gasztold

Ph. D. research fellow at the Historic Research Office of the Institute of National Remembrance in Warsaw and Assistant Professor at the War Studies University, Department of Terrorism Studies in Warsaw. He received his Ph.D. from the Warsaw University, Faculty of Journalism and Political Science in 2016. He is currently conducting research on Polish intelligence services, on relations between Communist Poland, the Middle East, African countries, on factions within the Polish United Workers’ Party, and the ties between the Soviet Bloc and international terrorism during the Cold War.

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Tina Andersen
Terrorism during the Holiday from History: how Western Security Services Dealt with Terrorism between 1989 and 2001

Constant Hijzen

Dr. Constant Hijzen is an Assistant Professor in Intelligence Studies at the Institute of Security and Global Affairs and the Institute for History at Leiden University (the Netherlands). He is head of the research group of Intelligence and Security of the Institute of Security and Global Affairs at Leiden University. He is also affiliated to the Institute for History of Leiden University. In his dissertation, he focused on the political, bureaucratic, and societal context of the Dutch security services. His current research focuses on the way Western security services lived through a paradigm shift from communism to terrorism as the most important target (1968-present). 

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Karl Lorentz Kleve
Planning and Execution of the Coup d'état Attempt in Estonia

Ivo Juurvee

is the Head of Security & Resilience Programme and Research Fellow at the International Centre for Defence and Security since 2017. Previously he has been a practitioner in the field of security for more than 13 years. Amongst other positions in Estonian public service, he has been an adviser at the National Security and Defence Coordination Unit of the Estonian Government Office and head of the Internal Security Institute of the Estonian Academy of Security Sciences.

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Tina Andersen
The Communist Coup in Estonia in 1924 in a Papers of the Polish Military Attache in Rewel. The Case Study of Soviet`s Foreign Politics in the 1920s

Tomasz Gajownik

a graduate of the history at the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń. Currently employed at the Institute of History and International Relations Univeristy of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn as an adjunct. He deals with the history of the twentieth century, with particular emphasis on the history of the Baltic States and the history of polish military intelligence in the years 1918-1945. He is the author of several dozen publications, including a monograph devoted to the activities of Second Bureau of the SGWP in Lithuania in the years 1921-1939. Laureate of the IH PAN and IPN competition for "Best Historical Debut of the Year 2008 W. Pobóg-Malinowskiego ", scholarship holder of the Brzezia Lanckoroński Foundation

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Sylwia Szyc
Tatarbunar rebellion in Romanian Bessarabia (1924): an operation of Soviet secret services or a modern jacquerie?

Igor Cașu

is Senior Lecturer and Director of the Center for the Study of Totalitarian Regimes & Cold War, State University of Moldova, Chișinău. He received his Ph.D. in Contemporary History from Jassy University (Romania, 2000) with a thesis on Soviet Nationalities Policy in Moldavia, 1944-1989. Since 1998 he teaches courses in Contemporary World, European and Moldovan/Romanian history. One of his newest master courses focuses on Political Police and Secret Services in 20th Century Moldova, covering Tsarist, Romanian interwar and Soviet periods. In 2010 he served as vice chairman of the Presidential Commission for the Study and Evaluation of the Communist Totalitarian Regime in the Republic of Moldova. In 2016 he was Fulbright Scholar at Stanford University giving talks on postwar famine in Moldova at Toronto University, Yale, Harvard, and Stanford. His recent publications include “The Fate of Stalinist Victims in Soviet Moldavia after 1953: Amnesty, Pardon and the Long Road to Rehabilitation”, in Kevin McDermott, Matthew Stibbe, eds., De-Stalinist Eastern Europe. The Rehabilitation of Stalin’s Victims, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 and “The Purge of the Purgers in the Moldavian ASSR after the Great Terror”, in Marc Junge, Lynne Viola and Jeffrey Rossman, eds., Chekisty on Trial (in Russian, Moscow, 2017) and “Soviet State Security and Cold War: Repression and Agent Infiltration against Jehovah’s Witnesses in Moldavian SSR, 1944-late 1950s”, in James Kapalo, Kinga Povedak, eds., The Secret Police and the Religious Underground in Communist and Post-Communist Eastern Europe, London: Routledge, 2019 (forthcoming).

He is working now on a book on the postwar famine in Soviet Moldavia, 1946-47, with a particular focus on the role of Soviet political and civil police during this period. He received a ten-month fellowship to work on that project at the New Europe College, Bucharest (October 2019-June 2010). 

 

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Karl Lorentz Kleve
The US intelligence failure in Pearl Harbor?

Joe Maiolo

I am Director of the Sir Michael Howard Centre for the History of War, and Professor of International History. I hold BA and MA degrees from the University of Toronto in history and philosophy. 

I completed my PhD in the Department of International History at the London School of Economics in July 1997. Before joining the Department of War Studies in September 2001, I held posts in the history of international relations at the London School of Economics (1997-98), Leicester (1998-99) and Leeds (1999-2001). I am an editor of The Journal of Strategic Studies, and co-editor of The Strategy Reader (Routledge, 2014) with Thomas G Mahnken, a member of the editorial board for Intelligence & National Security, and a fellow of theRoyal Historical Society.

In 2005-06 I was senior visiting research fellow at the Norwegian Institute for Defence Studies, Oslo. I am currently Visiting Research Professor at the Norwegian Defence Intelligence School, Oslo. 

Research Interests

My areas of interest include: 

  • The history of 20th Century International Relations and Warfare

  • Intelligence Studies

  • Deception in Peace and War

  • Strategic Studies

  • Arms Races and the Causes of War

  • Naval Warfare

  • Diplomacy

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Tina Andersen
The new opening from the British archives

Michael Goodman

Michael Goodman is Professor of Intelligence and International Affairs, Head of the Department of War Studies and Dean of Research Impact, King's College London. He is also a Visiting Professor at the Norwegian Defence Intelligence School and at Sciences Po in Paris. He has recently finished a secondment to the Cabinet Office where he has been the Official Historian of the Joint Intelligence Committee: Volume II which will be published in 2020.

Research Interests

  • Intelligence Studies

  • Nuclear Weapons History

  • Cold War History

Publications

He has published widely in the field of intelligence history and scientific intelligence, including Spying on the Nuclear Bear: Anglo-American Intelligence and the Soviet Bomb (Stanford University Press, 2008),  Spinning Intelligence: Why Intelligence Needs the Media, Why the Media Needs Intelligence (Columbia: Columbia University Press, 2009), Learning from the Secret Past: Cases in British Intelligence History (Georgetown University Press, 2011), The Routledge Companion to Intelligence Studies(Routledge, 2014); Spying on the World: The Declassified Documents of the Joint Intelligence Committee (Edinburgh University Press, 2014) and The Official History of the Joint Intelligence Committee, Volume I: From the Approach of the Second World War to the Suez Crisis (Routledge, 2014).  This last book, the Official History, was chosen as one of The Spectator’s books of the year.

His articles have appeared in Intelligence and National Security, the International Journal of Intelligence and CounterintelligenceCIA Studies in Intelligence, Cold War History, the Journal of Cold War Studies, the Journal of Strategic Studies, Cryptologia, The Journal of Intelligence History, Contemporary British History, Historical Studies in the Physical Sciences, Diplomacy and Statecraft, and International History Review.

He is series editor for ‘Intelligence, Surveillance, and Secret Warfare’ for Edinbur

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Tina Andersen